Time management teaching is an important issue, as in a stressful classroom environment, teachers are finding it increasingly difficult to find free time for themselves. As a new school year begins, time management teaching takes higher priority for many educators who are returning from a well deserved break. Here are some tips that will be helpful to teachers, as well as others.

1. Take Time Outs

Breaks rejuvenate and refresh you mentally and physically. But going on vacation every few days simply isn’t an option. So take shorter breaks frequently. In between classes, or even midway through a sesson, you can creatively take time-outs to recover your energy and enthusiasm. This helps you save time and return to work feeling more excited about teaching.

2. Go To Your Core

Teaching is a calling. You entered the profession with a dream. Think of 4 or 5 things that will take you closer to making it come true. Keep it in mind as you work through your day. Time management teaching evolves from seemingly unrelated stuff like this.

3. Identify Time Wasters

Are you spending too much time on a few troublesome students? Are you wasting precious resources gossiping with other teachers? Are you always complaining about things you cannot change? Identifying what wastes your time, and eliminating it from your life, can transform your efficiency.

4. Work On Your Schedule

Don’t let things passively happen to you. Take control by framing a schedule for your working day. Time management teaching is about setting priorities for the tasks you have to engage in today, and then assigning appropriate time slots for them to get done.

5. Consolidate Work

If other teachers have already done a part of the work you’re scheduled to deal with, see if you can collaborate to save time and effort. Ask for suggestions, and assistance from colleagues. As long as you’re not imposing too much upon others, they’ll be glad to help.

6. Avoid Meetings

Many board meetings, staff meetings, and parent-teacher meetings are wasteful. They can be circumvented by intelligent alternatives such as a message board or wiki to update concerned participants with information. A face to face meeting takes up time, but an asynchronous medium like email or SMS can work better.

7. Review Your Routine

Maybe you’ve always done things a certain way. Review it to see if you can be more efficient. Time management teaching says there are efficiencies to be tapped in 90% of your activities. By trying out variations and seeing if they work better, you might save a lot of time and stress.

8. Deal With Email

Too many teachers are overwhelmed by email. Learning to tackle the deluge smartly, using folders and filters to segregate incoming messages and dealing with the important ones right away can save time. Resist the urge to check email compulsively through the day.

9. Be Tough

Turn down requests on your time. Learn to say “No” firmly and politely. Your time is precious and has many demands on them. Unless other requests align with your priorities, it is best to turn them down. Saying “I’d love to help, but I’m stretched to my limit just now” is better than promising to help out, and then dropping the ball.

Time management teaching involves learning, and then implementing these various techniques and principles in your life and career. Essentially, all of them take common source from the concepts of Time Management Tao, which includes:

Time management training | Time Management Tao Home

Time Management Teaching